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Jonathan Scharrer podcast: Wisconsin law school’s restorative justice project (Aug. 2019)

August 21, 2019

From Madison, Wisconsin.

Jonathan Scharrer is the Director of the Restorative Justice Project (RJP) at the University of Wisconsin Law School’s Frank J. Remington Center. Scharrer has extensive experience as a facilitator of victim-offender dialogues in sensitive and serious crimes and as restorative justice trainer. His expertise also includes examining criminal justice policy with a focus on victim-empowerment and addressing racial disparities in the criminal justice system.

The Restorative Justice Project was first created in 1987 to serve victims and survivors in the aftermath of serious crimes. Through its victim-offender dialogue program the project offers the opportunity for victim survivors, and their relatives, to meet with and have questions answered by the individual who committed a crime against them.

RJI is pleased to showcase the excellent work of the Restorative Justice Project under Jonathan Scharrer’s leadership. Law schools should follow the example of the University of Wisconsin Law School and consider creating similar restorative justice projects like this model project. We need more lawyers who understand the great value of restorative justice for victims, offenders and communities. The Restorative Justice Project is an affiliate member of RJI.

Their website: https: //law.wisc.edu/fjr/rjp/

Listen:

There are 2 comments. Add Yours.

Susan Solis Haines —

Great interview. I participated in victim offender dialog in 2002 with SF Sheriff’s Dept in CA. Wrote a book that has just come available on my website. The website is areyoususan.com. Not sure what the URL is so posted in comments.Yes restorative justice is the direction we need to going in. Thank you for this podcast.

    lisarea —

    Thank you, Sue, for writing in. We look forward to reading your story. Thanks for sharing. Victim offender dialogue can be so
    important for a victim of violent crime.